Poggio Morina Tenuta, Vermentino, Toscana IGT, Italy, 2011, 13% abv

Vermentino is an aromatic white grape grown in France’s Languedoc-Roussillon and Provence (where it’s called Rolle), and also in Italy’s Sardinia, Liguria (Pigato), Piedmonte (Favorita) as well as in Corsica.  Here in Tuscany, it is called Vermentino as per the French.

This particular version is declassified as IGT because it falls outside of the DOC and DOCG rules.

The Poggio Morina is clear and bright, a medium lemon shade and shows youthful aromas of citrus (lemon drop and pomelo), dried herb and minerals.

The palate is dry with average alcohol and acidity with flavours of lemon balm and lemongrass, dried herbs, almonds and minerals.  An average finish rounds it out.

This is WSET Good wine; the acidity is average, but the aromas and fruit concentration are solid and balanced. The wine is refreshing and unique, herbal and has a lightly bitter almond taste on the back of the palate.  It’s a great summer wine; today was 20c and we enjoyed it with fresh garden greens, Italian dressing and barbecued chicken.

20140418-162623.jpg

About winellama

I love wine...and finally decided to do something about it.
This entry was posted in Italy, Rolle, Vermentino and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

2 Responses to Poggio Morina Tenuta, Vermentino, Toscana IGT, Italy, 2011, 13% abv

  1. Marta Chiavacci says:

    Vermentino is actually found in 13 DOC’s and 3 IGT’s in Tuscany. In the Bolgheri DOC for example, you can have up to 70% Vermentino in the Bolgheri Bianco. Each DOC will vary in the percentage of Vermentino allowed. It is widely planted Tuscany. It could be the second most widely planted varietal after Trebbiano Toscano. Each DOC, depending on their geographic location, will produce a different style of Vermentino. They range from fresh and light to rich and creamy. Michele Satta’s Costa di Giulia is a good example of the latter. And because it is 100% Vermentino, it is classified IGT as he is in the Bolgheri DOC area.

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s