Pinot Noir, Seven Terraces, Rossendale Winery, Canterbury, New Zealand, 2012, 13% abv, C$27

7 terracesWine is about people and community – it’s usually best enjoyed with others and it always has a story.

This Pinot Noir is no exception to that general rule.  From New Zealand’s South Island just 13 km south of Christchurch, it’s made from grapes grown at Rossendale Winery and supplied exclusively to Empson Wines Canada under the Seven Terraces label.

This is a family-owned vineyard that exports a Sauvignon Blanc in addition to the Pinot.  Winemaker Alan McCorkindale has twice been named New Zealand’s Winemaker of the Year and it’s clear as to why.

Clear and bright, the wine is a medium ruby with medium legs.  The nose shows medium plus aromas of raspberry, cranberries and salmon berries with holly, clove and mushroom.

The palate is dry with medium plus acidity and medium ripe tannin.  The alcohol is medium and the medium plus flavours show more raspberry and red plum with clove, vanilla and cedar frond with mushroom and forest floor.

Nicely balanced, this is a youthful wine that has some lovely complexity.  The finish is a medium plus and complemented our Thanksgiving turkey, cranberry with orange sauce, and brussel sprouts (think forest floor and leaves here).

Highly recommended for a turkey dinner – get it now!  It’s available in the UK under the ‘Rossendale’ label and in the US as ‘Cottesbrook’ at Total Wine and More.

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I love wine...and finally decided to do something about it.
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